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Cover Page

Biographical sketch of Author

Foreword
...a fact is never just a fact...

Table of Contents

Audio Introduction
...The Authors Voice...

Part I. Indian America
...step backwards to leap forward...

1. The Environment
...unleashed nature courts revenge...

2. Inter-Continental Diffusion
...people from everywhere, and before Columbus...

3. American Indian Nations
...500 peoples, all different...

Part II. European Invasions
...the Age of Discovery...

4. Renaissance and Reformation
...ideas are riskier than exploring...

5. Portuguese and Dutch
...smart, small, powerful and rich in their hey-day...

6. Spaniards
...in the 'otro mondo' of Southern USA...

7. French
...North and West USA with the Jesuits...

8. English
...the seaboard footholds...

9. Africans
...improbable survival...

Part III. Eighteenth Century Cultures
...catching up with Europe

10. Indian Recessions
...a dozen factors of fatal decline...

11. Dependency and Development
...too big for their britches...

12. Structures of Government
...social inventions and suppression...

13. Yankees
...doctrinaire elders in a crisis of love..

14. Pluralists
...people from everywhere...

15. Southerners
...planters, Blacks, and hoi polloi...

16. Frontier Folk
...cultural minimalism...

Part IV. Revolution and Constitution
...violence and rare cunning...

17. Prelude to Rebellion
...civil disobedience...

18. Seven-fold War
...independence, inevitable yet hard-won...

19. Continental Congress and Confederation
...better men than usually believed...

20. The Framers
...an elective king and the tax power...

21. Constitutional Government
...the Bill of Rights and a centralizing nation...

Part V. Direct Democracy
...omnipotence of the People...

22. Jefferson's Time
...buying Greater Louisiana...

23. The War of 1812
...Washington is burning...

24. Governance without Power
...the usual issues and a Monroe doctrine...

25. Jacksonian Democracy
...low-brow nationalism vs. Calhoun...

26. Settlement and Infrastucture
...how they lived and moved about...

27. Industrial and Urban Frontiers
...productive cities, immigrants, slums...

28. Character and Speech
...several American languages and personality types...

Part VI. Expansion and Integration
...how the West was won...

29. International Transactions
...Americans turned up everywhere...

30. The Hispanic Southwest and Texas
...fiercest ragamuffins win ...

31. The Mexican War
...a full war, including amphibious landings...

32. California
...a world apart with wide world contacts...

33. North and West
...an easy life...

Part VII. The Voluntary Culture
...nothing people couldn't do together...

34. Individualism and Affection
...anxiously alone and incidentally love...

35. Movements
...revivals, labor and utopias...

36. Arts and Sciences
...including games, Germans, and Transcendentalism...

37. Women as Feminists
...piety, protest, popular hatred...

38. Political Parties and Legislatures
...the balancers, hobbling through history...

Part VIII. Civil Strife
... futile debate, a million guns, and a century of terrorism...

39. Constitutional Law and States Rights
...much might be done that wasn't...

40. Slavery and State Sovereignty
...hidden in racism and paranoia...

41. War among the States
...a grandiose horrid lesson unlearned...

42. Civil War II, 1865-1965
...embracing a caste system...

Part IX. National Industrial Democracy
...the future arrives by steam and muscle...

43. Entangled Federalism
...pro-corporation courts, but a new civil service...

44. Immigration
...where we all came from...

45. Internal Migration
...a people endlessly boxing the compass...

46. Conversion to Urban Industrialism
...world champions and shameful cities...

Part X. Cultural Change
...the Celts conquer the cities...

47. Religious Practices
...Catholic ascendency...

48. Popular Culture
...jazz, fads, and nobody spoke English...

49. Sophisticated Culture
...nude descending a staircase...

50. Social Turbulence
...terrorism North and South...

XI. Imperialism
...catching up with world predation...

51. Patterns of Expansion
...bible, trade, guns and emulation...

52. The Caribbean
...America's Bean Bowl...

53. The Pacific Sphere
...business and the Navy hand in glove...

54. Finishing World War I
...a triumphant intervention but spoiled ending...

XII. New Political Formations
...high creativity from hard times...

55. Transforming Society
...what won't they think of next...

56. The Great Depression
...broke brokers singing "Can you spare a dime?"...

57. The New Deal
...finally a welfare state and creative tide...

58. Law and Constitution
...obstinate justices, centralized economy, bureaucracy...

XIII. Superpower
...a great promise and a meltdown...

59. Diplomacy of 1919 to 1945
...wistful isolationists and bangabouts...

60. World War II
...taking over Western civilization with the materiel of war...

61. Postwar Domestic Politics
...buying the vote changed from person to public...

62. World Domination and Cold War
...hi-costs of being numero uno...

63. Peripheral Wars
...Johnny on the spot...

XIV. Modernity and Malfunction
...skybursts of artifacts and ideas, and their fizzles...

64. Agriculture, Industry, Technology
...hi-tech uniformly unifying...

65. Consumerism and Fiscal Disorder
...downsizing future generations...

66. Exploitation and Crime
...2% jailed, but why so few?...

67. Well-being and Environment
...the donnybrook of people and nature...

68. Modern Culture
...let freedom ring...

XV. Re-Constitution
...all that's needed is highly improbable...

69. Leaders
...populist panjandrums...

70. A Revolution of Values
...americanizing world culture...

71. World Governance
...globality versus ethnicity...

Conclusion: Future History
... is short of hands...

Note on the Icon



separating chapter subsections: This is an emblem to indicate a change of perspective or topic. The icon reminds us that the contents may be surprising (!), but are formed (=) from adding (+), subtracting (-), multiplying (x), and dividing (/) relevant data; yet in the end, typically, (=) our history will always be open to questions(?).